TechHub: $5 Billion Investment in U.S. Manufacturing, IoT in Water & More

Goldman Sachs, China Team Up to Invest $5 Billion in U.S.Manufacturing

Goldman Sachs and China Investment Corporation (CIC) have announced the formation of a new partnership that will create a $5 billion fund named the China-US Industrial Cooperation Partnership, aimed at investing in U.S. manufacturing, according to the Business Review USA.

Tu Guangshao, Vice Chairman and President of CIC.

The fund will invest into businesses that have or can develop a connection with China, designed to promote market access for U.S. firms in China, in addition to improving the trade balance between the two countries.

“CIC has invested in the US for ten years and is committed to be both an investor and facilitator to develop a stronger China-US investment relationship,” said Tu Guangshao, Vice Chairman and President of CIC.

The fund will create a number of opportunities for American companies to export their products to the expansive Chinese market, with Goldman Sachs acting as the sponsor and investment manager of the fund.

Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs said, “The Cooperation Fund will increase Chinese investment in the United States, creating more opportunities for American workers and contributing to China’s economic transition and growth.”

Testing the IoT Waters

Originally Published in CRN

Solution provider GrayMatter is navigating the turbulent IoT waters, using its technical expertise and operational technology background to successfully deploy connected drinking fountains in public places like schools.

“We did a connected smart water fountain [with DC Water] – people think of that as a [classic] IoT application,” GrayMatter CEO James Gillespie told CRN. “That’s a good example because it combines a whole bunch of innovation.”

The Pittsburgh-based GE partner worked with the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority to create drinking fountains that monitor water quality and flow in real-time, which gives users more confidence in the water they are drinking while saving money spent on maintenance and testing.

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The smart drinking fountains, which will initially be installed in hospitals, daycare centers and schools, are equipped with sensors that use real-time data and analytics to monitor water quality and flow levels. The sensors then send that data to the cloud and back with alerts if water quality measurements begin to deteriorate.

Gillespie said the flow and water quality sensors give an accurate indicator of when the lead filter should be changed compared to traditional filters — like refrigerator filters — that measure flow only.

If water quality begins to deteriorate, alerts are sent by text or email to water managers, while… (Read More).

Data Management Tool Saves Big

A control system that’s responsible for servicing over 150,000 people has multiple applications, each with its own data source, and requires a tedious, time-consuming process of manually sifting through paper logbooks and binder after binder of printed reports when gaps exist in data sets.

This wastes time, money and causes a major headache for plant employees.

The City of Barrie was determined to fix this, saving 60 to 70-percent of the time previously used as a result of digital transformation.

By implementing a new data management tool, e.RIS, it allowed for:

  • Data commenting
  • Workflow for report approvals
  • Tag merge
  • Lab data integration and electronic logbooks

Learn more about e.RIS and catch up on other success stories:

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Testing The IoT Waters: How GE Partner GrayMatter Created A Smart Drinking Fountain

Originally published in CRN

Solution provider GrayMatter is navigating the turbulent IoT waters, using its technical expertise and operational technology background to successfully deploy connected drinking fountains in public places like schools.

“We did a connected smart water fountain [with DC Water] – people think of that as a [classic] IoT application,” GrayMatter CEO James Gillespie told CRN. “That’s a good example because it combines a whole bunch of innovation.”

The Pittsburgh-based GE partner worked with the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority to create drinking fountains that monitor water quality and flow in real-time, which gives users more confidence in the water they are drinking while saving money spent on maintenance and testing.

Do you follow us on LinkedIn?

The smart drinking fountains, which will initially be installed in hospitals, daycare centers and schools, are equipped with sensors that use real-time data and analytics to monitor water quality and flow levels. The sensors then send that data to the cloud and back with alerts if water quality measurements begin to deteriorate.

The smart sensor drinking fountain, a co-innovation product by GrayMatter and DC Water.

Gillespie said the flow and water quality sensors give an accurate indicator of when the lead filter should be changed compared to traditional filters — like refrigerator filters — that measure flow only.

If water quality begins to deteriorate, alerts are sent by text or email to water managers, while a “change filter” message alerts maintenance so they don’t have to estimate when lead filters should be changed.

“It’s IoT and the value of the network, so when you have multiple drops on the network you can now get like a Google map picture of the water quality instead of the traffic with blue, yellow and red signifying how the water quality is in different points of consumption,” said Gillespie. “At the same time we’ve made the devices intelligent so they check their own quality, and they try to clean themselves and let someone know if they need help being cleaned. It’s kind of a confluence of all these things that weren’t possible coming together.”

The connected drinking fountains are also programmed to shut off at a set water quality level until maintenance staff make the necessary corrections.

Gillespie said in many IoT projects, the solution provider is beginning to look at its customers as not just an end-user, but co-innovators: “When we work with someone like Washington DC Water, we’re really a co-innovation partner with them. So if you asked them, they’d say they come to us when they’re looking to solve a problem they couldn’t solve before, and they come to us to find out the art of the possible,” he said.

An essential part of the solution GrayMatter brought to the table was not only its knowledge of sensors, data analytics and cloud-based solutions – but its market expertise around digital utilities.

The knowledge of water and wastewater issues – like collection systems, regulations, water quality and utility management – helped the company better understand the outcomes that DC Water wanted and needed.

Interested in learning more?

Check out our white paper on water innovations and read more on IoT in water, game-changing technologies and more customer success stories:

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TechHub: Smart Drinking Fountains, Malware Threatening U.S. Power Grid, Manufacturing Profiting from IoT & More

Innovative fountains debut at nationwide water technology summit

A live demo of a new innovative smart sensor water fountain made its debut at ACE 2017, the American Water Works Association’s annual conference and exposition, in Philadelphia, PA.

GrayMatter and DC Water have created a drinking fountain that monitors water quality and flow in real time – giving users more confidence in the water they are drinking and saving money spent on maintenance and testing. The groundbreaking co-innovation project addresses lead levels – one of the most pressing issues in water.

“This project redefines public water consumption, putting people and clean water first,” Jim Gillespie, GrayMatter CEO.

The new smart sensor drinking fountain by GrayMatter & DC Water.

The new tech fountains have sensors that use real-time data and analytics to monitor both water quality and flow levels, sending that information to the cloud and back, alerting when water quality measurements begin to deteriorate.

Built with a special emphasis on lead in mind, the fountain will be used initially in schools, hospitals, day-cares and other similar institutions, according to George Hawkins, DC Water CEO and General Manager.

The co-innovation project is just the beginning of many ways private sector innovation and independent operations are joining forces to make water operations more efficient, at a lower cost. The fountains are set to be used in public places this fall, including schools.

Learn more about GrayMatter and DC Water innovations at GrayMatter’s annual conference, Transform 2017 held August 1-3 in Put-in-Bay, Ohio.

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Cyber experts identify malware that could disrupt U.S. power grid

The world was awaken to the dangerous potential of utility hacks in December when one-fifth of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, was without power due to a malicious malware that infiltrated their power grid.

Now dubbed CrashOverride, the same malware that left 225,000 without power in Ukraine, is said to have the ability to be modified and corrupt U.S. power grids as well, according to the Chicago Tribune.

“U.S. utilities have been enhancing their cybersecurity, but attacker tools like this one pose a very real risk to reliable operation of power systems,” said Michael Assante, who worked at Idaho National Labs and is former chief security officer of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, where he oversaw the rollout of industry cybersecurity standards.

cyber

The most concerning — and dangerous — components of CrashOverride are the ability to manipulate the settings on electric power control systems, as well as a “wiper” component that erases the software on the computer system that controls the circuit breakers.

This lets the malware scan for critical components that operate and open circuit breakers, creating a sustained power outage, and then lock the operator out of their system.

Although it has yet to demonstrate the level of complexity needed, according to the Tribune, the malware can theoretically be modified to target other industrial control utilities such as water and gas.

To get a better understanding of your operational technology control network, download our cyber guide, which walks you through the first steps in knowing what’s on your network and has specific advice about the assessment process from our top cyber security consultants.

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GE Digital urges partners to seek opportunities in the Industrial Internet of Things

GE has been one of the largest brands in selling appliances, aviation systems, energy controls, and industrial solutions for years, it’s no secret.

But in 2015, the company announced a new business – GE Digital – marking an effort to bring together its software and IT capabilities, according to CRN.

“Our goal is to co-innovate with the ecosystem,” said Kevin Ichhpurani, executive vice president of global ecosystem and channels and corporate officer at GE Digital.

As GE continues to reinvent itself, according to CRN, strong partnerships are a key element in order to innovate the industrial IoT.

“I think there’s a ton of opportunities around digital transformation overall,” said Jim Gillespie, CEO of GrayMatter. “But inside of that GE has many more opportunities around Brilliant Manufacturing, asset performance managements, field service transformation and cyber security. There’s just a lot of great areas for partners.”

Read more…

Study finds manufacturers are profiting from the IoT

MPI just released its 2017 study results on the Internet of Things with terrific news for the manufacturing industry, according to Industry Week.

The push to jump on the train to digitization or get left behind has been dramatic in recent years, and there’s been a sharp increase in awareness and investment in IoT technology as a result.

Now the numbers are in to prove how switching to IoT enabled products and applications are positively affecting the manufacturing industry for the better:

  • 72% report increased productivity
  • 69% report increased profitability
  • 65% report increased profitability from sales of IoT-enabled products (e.g., embedded intelligence)

GrayMatter co-founders Jim Gillespie & Carson Drake at the 2017 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs with top industry thought leaders.

Transforming operations is about connecting your equipment in the right way to eventually create a digital twin to mirror your physical operation and improve productivity. 

The biggest problem as to why manufacturers still aren’t jumping onboard is not knowing where to start.

Download our eBook to see how we’ve helped some of the biggest companies in the world overcome these obstacles and learn how to work smarter as a result:

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