TechHub: Ransomware Wreaking Global Havoc, Real-Time Asset Condition & Water Innovations

The Industrial Ransomware Wreaking Global Havoc

The recent global crisis of ransomware attacks on infrastructures and private businesses have left cyber experts and government authorities scrambling to double their efforts.

Computer systems were infected worldwide in June 2017 with a massive cyber attack similar to a recent assault that affected tens of thousands of machines internationally, causing critical infrastructures to take a major hit.

After recovering from a string of attacks that left thousands without power six months ago in December 2016, the citizens of Ukraine were faced with an even worse offense.

A.T.M.s stopped working, workers were forced to manually monitor radiation at the old, toxic Chernobyl nuclear plant due to computer failures and industrial employees worldwide were scrambling to respond to massive hacks.

“At the Chernobyl plant, the computers affected by the attack collected data on radiation levels and were not connected to industrial systems at the site, where, although all reactors have been decommissioned, huge volumes of radioactive waste remain. Operators said radiation monitoring was being done manually,” according to the New York Times.

The entirely new ransomware infected the systems of Ukraine’s power companies, metro services, airports and government ministries such as Kiev’s central post office.

The outbreak was the latest and most sophisticated in a series of attacks, using dozens of hacking tools, according to the NY Times.

The malware also had an impact internationally, causing system shutdowns of:

  • Danish shipping and transport company Moller-Maersk, resulting in an inability to process orders and its 76 terminals around the world became very congested.
  • Russian steel and oil firms Evraz and Rosneft.
  • French construction materials company Saint-Gobain.
  • Pharmaceuticals company Merck.
  • An Australian factory for chocolate giant Cadbury, resulting in halted production.
ransomware

Special Agent Keith Mularski, Unit Chief of the FBI Cyber Initiative & Resource Fusion Unit.

To continue the discussion on cyber espionage and industrial cyber security, join us at Transform 2017, our annual conference in Put-in-Bay, Ohio.

Special Agent Keith Mularski, Unit Chief of the FBI Cyber Initiative & Resource Fusion Unit heads the Cyber Initiative for the FBI and was part of an effort to declassify cyber threats and pass them on to industry.

Keith will walk through case studies of cyber incidents at US Steel, Alcoa and Westinghouse, revealing how the government communicated and worked together with industry to fight cyber crime.

Learn More About Transform 2017

Don’t Get Stuck in a Rut: Learn the True, Real-Time Condition of an Asset

Cars have data and analytics for when parts should be replaced, so why can’t your utility?

It can.

Like owning a car, the idea is similar for asset management. In a water treatment plant, pumps often come with a “best-by” sticker; a generic six-month date is stamped onto it, creating a time-based system for maintenance, regardless of usage.

ransomware

The date becomes the driving factor for servicing rather than following data.

But there is a better way to capture condition of assets consistently, accurately and efficiently.

The solution lies in combining two systems already in place and leveraging the findings to save time and money, drastically increasing uptime.

Download the white paper to learn how to leverage digital data to effectively and accurately forecast maintenance of assets.

Download the White Paper

Water Innovation Pact Signed to Promote Smart Water Networks

The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and Smart Water Networks Forum (SWAN) recently formed a pact to jointly promote the development of best industry practices for sustainable smart water networks.

Smart water networks detect system leaks and manage energy through incorporating technology, according to Water Technology, an online water news publication.

“Supporting innovation is essential to the water sector, and to further development of intelligent water systems,” WEF executive director Eileen O’Neill said.

In the wake of technological advancements in the water sector, the combination of the groups’ focus on smart wastewater network management and integrated intelligent water practices will provide new skill sets and knowledge, allowing for workforce advancement.

ransomware

Co-innovated smart drinking fountain by GrayMatter & DC Water.

The partnership seeks to determine common barriers of implementing intelligent water practices, technology trends and new solutions.

GrayMatter and DC Water have recently had success through a partnership of their own by co-innovating a smart sensor drinking fountain.

A drinking fountain that monitors water quality and flow in real time – giving users more confidence in the water they are drinking and saving money spent on maintenance and testing. The groundbreaking project addresses lead levels – one of the most pressing issues in water.

“This project redefines public water consumption, putting people and clean water first,” Jim Gillespie, GrayMatter CEO.

The new tech fountains have sensors that use real-time data and analytics to monitor both water quality and flow levels, sending that information to the cloud and back, alerting when water quality measurements begin to deteriorate.

The co-innovation project is just the beginning of many ways private sector innovation and independent operations are joining forces to make water operations more efficient, at a lower cost. The fountains are set to be used in public places this fall, including schools.

Learn more about the GrayMatter and DC Water water innovation project at Transform 2017:

  Learn More About Transform 2017

 

TechHub: The Internet of Energy, Digital Solutions in Water & Brilliant Manufacturing

The Internet of Energy: Big Data & Electrons

The Internet of Things (IoT) is an industry-wide term for connected and smart devices within a network of connectivity that allows them to collect and exchange data.

A new and not-so-understood concept, being dubbed the “internet of power” by Forbes, is applying the use of big data, machine learning and IoT technology to replace the one-way, current model of energy delivery.

GE Power, that supplies 30-percent of the world’s electricity, has been developing this opportunity in an effort to revolutionize the electricity industry.

“The electricity industry is still following a one-hundred-year-old model which our founder, Edison, helped to proliferate,” said Chief Digital Officer at GE Power Ganesh Bell in Forbes.

Bell believes that can change, and that the answer is to take advantage of the current grid-based generation and delivery mechanism, increasing it with the flow of data.

This will take that linear model and move it to a networked model; taking every electron, associating it with a data bit, and optimizing it.

Creating this new system of “smart” energy distribution will pave the way for innovative structures in the future such as a reliable network of energy for charging stations, aiding society in the move away from fossil fuels.

This adoption of IoT technology will transform the power industry to a $1.3 trillion field within the next 10 years, according to Forbes.

Join us in Chicago on April 10th for Digital Day to learn more about the digital, industrial transformation and connect with top thought leaders from companies like Johnson & Johnson, Gray Matter, GE and more.

Register for Digital Day

Brilliant Factory in Grove City Puts New Life in Old Engines



The engine remanufacturing plant in Grove City, PA, has been operating for 5 years, occupies 440,000-square feet and employs more than 400 people.

The facility has made a huge transformation from being a food packaging plant into being one of GE’s first seven high-tech “brilliant” factories.

Gray Matter, through a partnership with GE, has helped implement advanced technology such as sensors that allow workers to measure and see real-time data at a glance. This improves reliability, has reduced downtime by 10 to 20-percent and boosts productivity.

The Grove City plant refurbishes diesel engines, taking old engines and give them life again.

This used to require works to manually tighten bolts in a repetitive motion by hand, using machines weighing in at 40-pounds on 41,000-pound engines, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 

This new technology allowed them to have an automated way to uniformly tighten the bolts in a sequence, preventing possible injury to the workers and creating a standard for all of the bolts.

It also gives plant managers the ability to call up data on a tablet or smart phone rather than touring plant operations on foot, allowing them to address problems sooner and supervise workers remotely.

Join Gray Matter on April 18th for our Toronto Seminar and learn more about digital innovations in manufacturing, water and energy.

Connect with leaders from companies such as GE Digital, CyberX, Eramosa and more for a full day of discussion, followed by an optional Blue Jays v. Red Sox game.

Register Now

Partnering Digital Solutions & IIoT Technology to Benefit Water


The ultimate goal for water and wastewater utilities is to always be safer in order to protect the communities they serve.

GE Water put out on social this week a piece written by Steve Davis, a business development leader at GE Power, Water & Process Technologies.

It discusses the problems of the world of water and how the solutions lie within industry partnerships.

According to Davis, there is no single company in the water industry that can provide connectivity, platform, software and analytics all in one.

A quote from Gray Matter VP of Water in Water Innovations: Creating a Better Living.

The solutions to these problems are exist, however are still in their infancy and fragmented.

By uniting experts within the industry, a combined commercial effort is created through a mutually beneficial relationship.

By connecting top industry thought leaders, the partnerships cultivate into innovative ideas that can excel the industry and pace of the digital revolution. It simplifies data integration, and takes away the once overwhelming feeling for customers by interconnecting platforms.

New technologies are giving people hope that they can achieve better standards of living, and Gray Matter is helping to lead the way in the water evolution.

Download our white paper Water Innovations Create Better Living to read real customer success stories of increased efficiency and profits through innovative technology.

Download the White Paper

Surprise: Your Control Network is Connected to the Internet

That Awkward Moment

It happens daily.

A company is investigating a cyber security breach. Word of the breach gets out and suddenly their brand, reputation and trade secrets are all at stake.

It’s a really awkward moment and a PR nightmare. I read the quotes and calming explanations from communications executives that despite the breach often say — don’t worry — our systems are not connected to the Internet or any external network. Are they sure? How sure?

When we test cyber vulnerabilities at some of the biggest manufacturing and energy companies and water utilities, it’s surprising how many internet and external connections exist that top security leaders didn’t know about. We start the assessment and within seconds the room is silent.

Surprise, your control network is connected to the Internet.

Getting on the Same Operational Page

Part of the solution is making sure all members of your team are on the same page.

In many cases all your cyber security planning has secured the information technology (IT) side, while at the same time your oper­ational technology (OT) is left wide open and it’s a dangerous gap.

According to the HIS technology report, “Industrial IoT 2014,” less than half of Internet-connected devices are above the firewall. More than half are actually below it– in the operation­al technology (OT) underbelly.

Imagine a house with a bolted front door and a state-of-the-art home security system out front. It may seem secure, but the back window is wide open.

Your cyber security plan is no different. Ignoring operational technology cyber security is like leaving the back window or door wide open.

Corporate IT is significant and needs to be protected. It’s your emails, financials, documents and passwords. Protecting this sensitive information is imperative.

OT is a whole different level.

Operational technology is the hardware and software used to control all your industrial processes. These are the critical systems that clean water, make food and produce energy. If they’re attacked, the results can be dangerous and lead to power outages, environmental damage and even loss of life.

While spending for IT protection has increased, OT spending is often secondary, creating huge vulnerabilities.control network connected internet

In the past, OT systems were separate from IT but as interconnectivity spreads they’re becoming increasingly integrated.

OT can now be reached through IT and it’s becoming more susceptible to network attacks.

Not long ago, hackers caused major damage at a steel mill in Germany. They came in through the IT side, but after stealing logins through email were able to access the mill’s control systems. Now that hackers were on the operational technology (OT) side, the IT protection in place was no longer helping.

This led to parts of the plant failing, causing a furnace blast and significant damage.

Specialized software created by the hackers was used to oversee and administer the plant.

In the aftermath, software developers and digital analysts said they “didn’t expect a nuclear power plant or steel plant to be connected to the Internet.”

Depending on who you’ve hired to run security, they may fall on the IT side, OT side or somewhere in between. It’s imperative they know the operational technology side as well.

Knowing the tools and systems on the operational side takes a very special skillset.

The nature of devices on the OT network are different than those commonly found on IT networks. We’re talking about PLCs, RTUs, SCADA servers, Historian servers, data concentrators, etc.

Some legacy PLCs are equipped with built-in webservers. As a result, it’s important for us to understand not just what is on your OT network, but also how it’s behaving. Using “active” monitoring devices on an OT network can not only disrupt communication timing, but can lock up OT devices like PLCs.

In some cases, you may want to organize the OT network so that only a select set of devices can communicate to other sets of devices.

A key takeaway from a recent Department of Homeland Security conference on cyber security for op­erational technology ICS-CERT (Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team) was to first take inventory of all your connected devices digitally (or manually) to trace every connection.control network connected internet

This directive is for public/government utilities, private manufacturing and energy companies. Home­land Security advises mapping all the devices to determine where you currently have undocumented connections and to understand your overall risk.

A digital inventory is recommended as long as it is passive and does not actively ping or ask the OT devices for information.

Big Things are at Stake

The rapid growth of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is changing the game on all of this. As billions of sensors are being shipped that incorporate IIoT technology, knowing what is on your OT network is critically important.

Given the high likelihood that your OT network will grow, you might want to ask your team:

Are you truly confident that you know everything that’s plugged in or connected wirelessly to everything else on the network? How often have you or someone on your team traced every run from switch to device either manually or digitally?

Big things are at stake, so it’s important to be honest as you answer those questions.

Take The Cyber Challenge

Nobody has all the answers, but you can gain valuable insight into your own operations and strategies.

The cyber challenge is designed to pose important, valuable questions to your cyber strategy. You’ll find out just how much you currently know and don’t know about your own system.

Take our new Industrial Internet Cyber Security quiz and share the results with your team. Who had the best scores?

Take the Challenge

 

Gray Matter Systems’ Brian Courtney Right at Home on Innovation Drive

When someone new arrives at a company, they often take a few months to settle in, meet the team members and adjust to the new environment. But not in Brian Courtney’s case.

The MIT graduate jumped right in and started building and working with his hands at GrayMatter’s headquarters on Innovation Drive just outside of Pittsburgh. Brian has been sawing, gluing and piecing pipes together for an innovative, exclusive GrayMatter project since Day One.

Brian is the new Vice President of Development and Managed Services at GrayMatter and he’s a true innovator. It shows in every conversation you have with him.

I believe there are many different styles of innovation. One of them happens to be a tinkerer,” said Brian. “I get excited about learning — a little here and a little there until it suddenly comes together in your head.

The new leadership position is a key part of GrayMatter’s recent growth. Brian will focus on building software solutions to reduce cost and increase efficiencies in manufacturing, water and energy.

Brian will help companies use analytics to determine early signs of failure before they have major equipment problems.

“Unfortunately, failures happen during the worst possible times. Machine learning helps us identify failure before something majorly goes wrong,” said Brian. “Part of my role at GrayMatter is helping companies get ahead with predictive analytics.”

Developing and building are in his blood. Brian comes from GE where he held many roles including leading a data visualization team. His team won several awards for innovation and filed for 26 patents.

“My job was to drive the team to ideate and think innovatively,” said Brian.

Brian also attributes his deep technology background and business acumen with giving him a good sense of solutions that will work the best for customers. He graduated with a computer science degree from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and got his MBA from MIT.

Brian said that the Industrial Internet of Things is already flipping the way the business world works. With massive amounts of data to maintain and analyze, customers expect connectivity and information on everything they’re running. This is turning more businesses into customer-facing operations than in the past when information was just an internal focus.

Small and medium-sized companies alike are giving the biggest ones ideas on how to journey through the transition.

A self-professed tinkering jack-of-all-trades, Brian likes to break things. He’d rather learn from failure to figure out what went wrong and how knowing about it sooner would have prevented that failure.

I think Edison said it best when he said he simply found 10,000 ways to not make a light bulb,” said Brian. “I believe people learn from their mistakes instead of their successes.

Look for Brian Courtney’s next innovation in the coming months at Gray Matter Systems. For now — here’s a behind-the-scenes look as Brian tests a water system he just built on Innovation Drive:

Brian Courtney on Innovation Drive from Gray Matter Systems on Vimeo.

Contact GrayMatter

Get in touch with us!