Gray Matter Systems’ Brian Courtney Right at Home on Innovation Drive

When someone new arrives at a company, they often take a few months to settle in, meet the team members and adjust to the new environment. But not in Brian Courtney’s case.

The MIT graduate jumped right in and started building and working with his hands at Gray Matter’s headquarters on Innovation Drive just outside of Pittsburgh. Brian has been sawing, gluing and piecing pipes together for an innovative, exclusive Gray Matter project since Day One.

Brian is the new Vice President of Development and Managed Services at Gray Matter Systems and he’s a true innovator. It shows in every conversation you have with him.

I believe there are many different styles of innovation. One of them happens to be a tinkerer,” said Brian. “I get excited about learning– a little here and a little there until it suddenly comes together in your head.

The new leadership position is a key part of Gray Matter’s recent growth. Brian will focus on building software solutions to reduce cost and increase efficiencies in manufacturing, water and energy.

Brian will help companies use analytics to determine early signs of failure before they have major equipment problems.

“Unfortunately, failures happen during the worst possible times. Machine learning helps us identify failure before something majorly goes wrong,” said Brian. “Part of my role at Gray Matter is helping companies get ahead with predictive analytics.”

Developing and building are in his blood. Brian comes from GE where he held many roles including leading a data visualization team. His team won several awards for innovation and filed for 26 patents.

“My job was to drive the team to ideate and think innovatively,” said Brian.

Brian also attributes his deep technology background and business acumen with giving him a good sense of solutions that will work the best for customers. He graduated with a computer science degree from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and got his MBA from MIT.

Brian said that the Industrial Internet of Things is already flipping the way the business world works. With massive amounts of data to maintain and analyze, customers expect connectivity and information on everything they’re running. This is turning more businesses into customer-facing operations than in the past when information was just an internal focus.

Small and medium-sized companies alike are giving the biggest ones ideas on how to journey through the transition.

A self-professed tinkering jack-of-all-trades, Brian likes to break things. He’d rather learn from failure to figure out what went wrong and how knowing about it sooner would have prevented that failure.

I think Edison said it best when he said he simply found 10,000 ways to not make a light bulb,” said Brian. “I believe people learn from their mistakes instead of their successes.

Look for Brian Courtney’s next innovation in the coming months at Gray Matter Systems. For now—here’s a behind-the-scenes look as Brian tests a water system he just built on Innovation Drive:

Brian Courtney on Innovation Drive from Gray Matter Systems on Vimeo.

CIO Survey Reveals Challenges, Opportunities and Potential of Industrial Big Data

Guest post by Jeremiah Stone, GM of Asset Performance Management at GE Digital. 

Bit Stew Systems recently commissioned a survey by IDG Research of senior IT executives to better understand how organizations are being impacted by the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) – the steps being taken to prepare for it, the potential benefits the IIoT offers, and the challenges encountered along the way.

Jeremiah Stone, General Manager of Asset Performance Management, at GE Digital, shares his insights on how the research findings match up with his experience at GE.

Industrial companies are in the midst of an exciting and transformational digital journey. At the heart of this transformation is the power of real-time and predictive data analytics to unlock new sources of value. However, challenges of big data, unique to the Industrial world, and the threat of digital disruption and changing workforce dynamics are real.

In order to maximize the fast-moving technology wave of the Industrial Internet, companies need to think strategically about the foundational elements of their data architecture, starting with industrial data management.

Abundant Data by Itself Solves Nothing
Despite the promise of big data, industrial enterprises are struggling to maximize its value. Why? Abundant data by itself solves nothing. Its unstructured nature, sheer volume, and variety exceed human capacity and traditional tools to organize it efficiently and at a cost which supports return on investment requirements. Inherent challenges tied to evolution and integration of industrial information and operational technology, make it difficult to glean intelligence from operational data, compromising projects underway and promise for further investment and value.

Research Confirms Data Integration is Slowing IIoT Adoption
We have seen first-hand, how data integration has challenged IT and OT teams for decades. The advent of IIoT adoption is compounding the problem. The insights from the IDG survey match up well with our experience. Senior IT executives are echoing the sentiment that data integration is the #1 barrier inhibiting IIoT adoption in their organizations. 64% of senior IT executives surveyed said that integrating data from disparate sources/formats and extracting business value from that data is the single biggest challenge of big data. As we go forward, driving technology advances and best practices to integrate disparate data sets is critical.

Lack of Preparedness will Cost your Business
According to the survey, senior IT executives are saying the biggest risk of not having an IIoT strategy in place is losing valuable data insights which can significantly cost their business. 87% state the most concerning risks of not have a data management strategy is they will be overwhelmed by the volume and veracity of data being generated, and they will lose valuable business insights as a result. In addition, 33% say they are afraid that businesses that don’t adopt a data management strategy will become marginalized, obsolete or disappear.

Finding a Better Way: Maximizing Value from Machines and Enterprise Data
At GE, we are experiencing first-hand a better way—a better way to manage industrial big data that triggers insights. We are in the early stages of a long journey
of discovery and invention, taking a longer-term view to strategic data management and its technologies that translate to business advantage. Our businesses, customers, and partners are committing their business success by transforming to become data-driven businesses. At GE Digital, we are investing in our capabilities and the ecosystem to deliver the right solution to help them get there.

To extract meaning and value from industrial data, new systems are required to handle the challenges posed by the volume, velocity and variety of these data sets. Many industrial companies have already started their digital journeys towards Industrial Internet maturity. Technologies including automated integration and empirical data model management, machine learning and physics-based analytics, that we have been deploying for our customers, are
now seeing double-digit performance gains across the following sectors: power generation, oil and gas, transportation and mining.

Learn More About This Topic

IDG Research White Paper | Download the in-depth report here.

This blog post originally appeared on Bit Stew Systems’ blog page, Bit View. 

Gray Matter Systems Talks Technology on TechVibe Radio

 

Gray Matter Systems CEO, Jim Gillespie, appeared on the TechVibe podcast on Friday, Sept. 9 to talk about Gray Matter’s role in the emerging technology scene in Pittsburgh.

“We help some of the biggest manufacturing companies and water treatment plants to innovate, make better data-driven decisions. We connect critical assets to people,”

Jim Gillespie, CEO

Listen Here:

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